There is always a person behind the disease

We encounter the family dad, the old-bag lady and the young student who needs help to get back to their lives and that’s what we provide here, says Rasmus, senior resident.

​Rasmus Malthesen, senior resident at a mental health centre in The Capital Region of Denmark

​When the world is collapsing, we are ready to step in

We meet all kinds of people in the closed psychiatric departments, with all kinds of behaviours. Some are heavily psychotic and are brought here against their own will and their sickness may have provoked screaming and yelling, violence, self-destruction or threatening behaviour towards neighbours and family. Daily tasks such as grocery shopping and cooking are put on standby. Bills may not have been paid and the house might be put up for sale. For some people life is at its worst when they arrive here and their world can in some cases be crumbling around them.

We help people back to their lives

Regardless of what people have done prior to coming here, we start helping as soon as they step through the door, both medically, socially and physically, all in accordance to their individual needs. Some are quicker to recover than others. Typically, we use the first week to diagnose properly and to compose a sustainable plan of action together with the patients, in order to help them back to their lives. Mental health illnesses vary a lot; nevertheless, we are often able to predict the course of treatment and thereby also bring forth the aspects that make their illness manageable.

A fantastic field

To be able to help someone suffering from mental illness takes time which is definitely what makes this particular field interesting - that we have time for the patients and get to know them and have the possibility to help them towards their individual goal of treatment. It is very satisfying every time we see someone succeed - to see a tormented person, when he or she arrives, to when that person can return home with a reasonable control over his or her illness.

Something many colleagues don't know about me

When you add up work, overtime, wife and kids, there is not a lot of time left during the week. However, a couple times a week I go down to the kayak club and paddle out on Oresund. It helps me relax and is a great way to take my mind of things.

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